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  • Jimmy Carlyle
  • Milagro Saints
  • Stephen David Ineson
  • Six Mile Grove (+ Bob Wootton)
  • Rowan Galagher
  • houdidontblog
  • Norman John Darwen
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FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

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A photo by FSR Featured Artist this month was featured
Aug 27
FSR Featured Artist this month posted photos
Aug 27
A video by FSR Featured Artist this month was featured

Katie Anne Mitchell-No One Knows Millie Live

Katie Anne Mitchell FSR Featured Artist September 2018
Aug 27
FSR Featured Artist this month posted a video

Katie Anne Mitchell-No One Knows Millie Live

This video is about My Movie 5
Aug 27
FSR Featured Artist this month updated their profile
Aug 27
A blog post by FSR Featured Artist this month was featured

Featured Artist for September Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The…See More
Aug 27
FSR Featured Artist this month posted a blog post

Featured Artist for September Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The…See More
Aug 27
FSR Featured Artist this month updated their profile photo
Aug 27
FSR Featured Artist this month posted a video

Carrington MacDuffie in Belgium June 10 2018

Zennegat 13 is an anchiet canal lockside hostelry near Antwerp Flanders renowned for its live music,cuisine, atmosphere and beer, we caught up with Austins C...
May 12
A blog post by FSR Featured Artist this month was featured

Dana Cooper Flyinshoes Review Featured Artist Irish Tour and new album (# 26)

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas…See More
May 7
FSR Featured Artist this month posted a blog post

Dana Cooper Flyinshoes Review Featured Artist Irish Tour and new album (# 26)

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas…See More
May 7
FSR Featured Artist this month posted a photo
Jan 6
A blog post by FSR Featured Artist this month was featured

Ed Romanoff FSR first featured artist of 2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and…See More
Jan 6
FSR Featured Artist this month posted a blog post

Ed Romanoff FSR first featured artist of 2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and…See More
Jan 6
Jimmy Carlyle and FSR Featured Artist this month are now friends
Nov 29, 2017
4 photos by FSR Featured Artist this month were featured
Nov 29, 2017
 

Dana Cooper FSR Featured Artist

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured Artist this month's Blog

Featured Artist for September Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell…

Continue

Posted on August 27, 2018 at 21:41

Dana Cooper Flyinshoes Review Featured Artist Irish Tour and new album (# 26)

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to…

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Posted on May 7, 2018 at 17:00

Ed Romanoff FSR first featured artist of 2018

Ed Romanoff could…

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Posted on January 6, 2018 at 16:46

Tommy Lewis! Our last Featured Artist of The Month on FSR for 2017

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature…

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Posted on November 28, 2017 at 17:00

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

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At 10:49 on March 9, 2011, John (Biscuits and Gravy) Davy said…

Hey!   Tex - O - Billy! Does what it says on the tin

Great stuff

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

FSR Featured artist Katie Anne Mitchell

From anthropology graduate student to actor to singer/songwriter and storyteller, Katie Anne Mitchell has settled on the term “creative universalist” to encapsulate all manner of artistic sins. Her debut album “The Many Lives of Mockingbird” is a reflection of her diverse approach with a half-audiobook/half-song concoction that is reflective, humorous, and just a little bit mad. The otherworldliness of Luna Lovegood meets the heartbreak of the Greek Persephone meets the convoluted spiritualism of the Fox sisters for an intimate around-the-campfire folk tale.

Mitchell regularly performs out solo and with her irreverent witchy folk duo “The Middle Annes” alongside Rebekah LeAnn Wiggins (featured on the album as well) at iconic L.A. venues including Hotel Café, The Viper Room and The Mint. As one fan describes on watching her perform at Folk Alliance International that watching her is like watching the musical 'Theatre of the Absurd.'She likes that.She was additionally awarded the “Live and Amplified” award for her original tune “The Dreamer”, a political tune about Santa Claus (naturally). She currently lives in Los Angeles and is a lover of wine, cheese, and trouble.

Visit Katie Anne here on The House Concert Hub (Book her) 

http://houseconcerthub.ning.com/profile/KatieAnneMitchell

Out of the heartland of America, stomping grounds of Truman and Twain, “powerhouse” troubadour Dana Cooper dedicated himself to a life of music over 40 years ago. This song poet engages and inspires audiences around the world with his quick wit, insightful stories and commanding presence. He is the recipient of the 2014 Heritage Musician award from Pilgrim Center for the Arts in Kansas City, MO. He was also named the 2015 Spirit of Folk award winner by Folk Alliance International. He has performed on Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage and the Kerrville Folk Festival where he was nominated for their Hall of Fame. Cooper’s songs have been recorded by top-notch artists such as bluegrass star Claire Lynch; Irish vocalist Maura O’Connell; and luminary songwriters Pierce Pettis and Susan Werner. Cooper’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legend among other guitarists. An expressive singer his voice is ageless evoking a rich lifetime of experience.

At 12 he sang, played drums, guitar and harmonica in local bands. By 13 he began writing his own songs and at 16 he performed regularly at the prestigious Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City. His deep love and commitment to a life of music drew Cooper away from an art scholarship. Cooper took to the road touring midwest college coffeehouses for one year then sold an electric guitar and his entire record collection to buy a one-way ticket to Los Angeles. Four months later he was signed to Elektra Records where his eponymous first album was released in 1973. The record features such acclaimed players as Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel and Jim Horn.Years later he returned to San Francisco City College to study another great love, horticulture. Still he played whenever possible in clubs all over the Bay Area. Cooper’s diverse experiences as a taxi driver, warehouseman, nurse’s aid, gardener, waiter and touring musician continued to bring maturity and depth to his songwriting.

Cooper eventually moved to Texas writing, performing and recording with Shake Russell in the late 70s and with his own power trio, DC3 during the early 80s. Returning to his roots as a solo performer Cooper relocated to Nashville in 1988. He has become an integral figure in the Music City songwriting community collaborating with renowned writers such as Tom Kimmel, Sally Barris, Kim Carnes and Don Henry. Cooper has been invited to participate in songwriting workshops from Belfast to Copenhagen to Austin.

 His prolific endeavors have resulted in 28 albums. The critically acclaimed Miracle Mile on Compass Records was nominated for a Nashville Music Award as “Best Pop Album” and was chosen by Performing Songwriter magazine as one of the top DIY recordings for the year. Harry Truman Built a Road was named one of the best records of 2002 by The Tennessean and was also chosen as one of the top twelve DIY recordings for that year. Made of Mud released on King Easy Records in 2005 won Cooper the “Best Male Songwriter Award” by Indie Acoustic Project. Working with co-producer/guitarist Thomm Jutz, Cooper released his 27th album, Building a Human Being, in September, 2015. 

Cooper and Jutz also coproduced his 28th recording, Incendiary Kid, which was released October 20, 2017 on Travianna Records. Americana and Folk radio stations across America are now playing the new CD It is going to European Media in June of 2018, contact Rob Ellen for more info. Robert K. Oermann in Music Row Magazine says of Building a Human Being “Nashville veteran Cooper wins the Disc of the Day prize. Highly recommended.”

Fellow singer songwriter Buzz Holland says “Cooper is a person who can sing like an angel and play like the devil.”

Legendary Texas singer songwriter Eric Taylor said of Cooper’s performance at Kerrville Fall Festival 2015 “Dana Cooper gave the best solo performance I’ve seen and heard for many years. Could be the best I’ve ever.”

Currently in Ireland preparing for his sold out Inishfree Irish Music Tour which starts on June 12th.  Counties Cork, Kerry and Clare.

http://www.danacoopermusic.com.hostbaby.com/ireland_2018

Ed Romanoff could be a character in one of his own songs. A chronicler of American experience whose voice recalls the grit of Kris Kristofferson and the wit of Guy Clark, the New York singer-songwriter pens wise, big-hearted, occasionally whimsical, usually melancholic tunes about lonely souls and romantic dreamers, lost lovers and coy ghosts, a bank robber and even the Elephant Man himself. Not only does Romanoff sympathize with the crew of outsiders and outlaws on his new album The Orphan King, (release Feb 23)but he also belongs among their ranks: an artist who has spent a lifetime drifting from job to job, steadfastly refining his craft for years on a 75 dollar Yamaha guitar, following his own compass, and solving his own mysteries.

Romanoff admits he started late. “My father was tone deaf,” he says, “so I always thought I was, too.”  Instead of music, he tended bar in Virginia and branded cattle in Wyoming before eventually founding PineRock, a production firm in New York City. When he finally decided to pursue music in his forties, he became a diligent student, writing constantly and performing wherever and whenever he could. He spent time in Nashville taking songwriting classes and attending workshops with Darrell Scott, Beth Nielson Chapman, and Mary Gauthier, who later invited him to go on the road. Before he even had an album with his name on the spine, Romanoff was touring the world. 

Romanoff’s unconventional journey gave him a different perspective from other songwriters, a different set of rules and a different voice. His 2012 self-titled debut, produced by Crit Harmon (Lori McKenna, Martin Sexton), won the Nashville Songwriters Song of the Year and later that year Romanoff joined Steve Earle and James McMurtry as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition. Since then, Romanoff has been working on a follow-up, amassing a stockpile of gracefully observed and eloquently sturdy songs. He didn’t have to stray far from his home in Woodstock to record them; instead, he worked with Simone Felice at the producer’s barn studio in Palenville, New York, just a few miles down the road.

The pair corralled an impressive roster of locals to flesh out the songs, including Romanoff’s longtime friend and touring mate Rachael Yamagata, Kenneth Pattengale of the Milk Carton Kids, guitarist Cindy Cashdollar (Dylan’s Time Out of Mind), The E Street Band’s Cindy Mizelle, and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, along with Larry’s wife and duo partner, Teresa Williams. Together, they forged rootsy and eccentric arrangements for Romanoff’s songs, heightening the wee-hours longing of “The Night Is a Woman” and supernatural  melancholy of “Miss Worby’s Ghost.” Campbell, whom Romanoff credits with providing “the backbone of the album,” lends a fierce guitar solo to “The Ballad of Willie Sutton,” turning the coda into a gothic car chase across some mythic American plain.

The Orphan King reveals an artist alive to the serendipity of songwriting: those flashes of insight and inspiration, often accidental, that convey ideas and feelings unique to this medium. He co-wrote the title track, which sounds as lonely as a graveside eulogy after everyone has left for the reception, about his close relationship with his father. Imagine his surprise when, several years later, a DNA test sent him reeling: “I had spent my life idolizing my dad, and believing I was Russian, but the test said I was Irish. My father wasn’t my father.”

The revelation sent him into a depression so deep that he barely left his apartment for months. When he returned to “The Orphan King,” written before he know his own story, he found the song’s sense of loss even more acute and the sense of connection even stronger, the words of the refrain resonating like a personal mantra: “I still believe in love.”

Not every song on The Orphan King is quite so autobiographical. In fact, the album shows Romanoff as a writer with an eye for the telling historical detail and an imagination attuned to the whimsical. His fascination with Joseph Merrick inspired “The Elephant Man,” a humanizing portrait of a man known for his deformities but, in Romanoff’s hands, is granted a rare dignity to explore his intense yearning for life and finds love in the form of a very tall carnival worker. “I felt if I could have him meet somebody who was just as much an outsider as he was, then they could be together.” The song became an act of compassion and empathy, as Romanoff imagines a happy ending for the unusual couple: “I’m gonna build a car with Ferris wheel tires, leave extra headroom to reach the stars. World’s largest truck, well, it will be ours as we go rolling into history.”

Songs like “Without You” and “Leavin’ With Someone Else” can break your heart, but Romanoff has a knack for the well-earned happy ending. He obviously loves his characters, and he listens to what they tell him. He turns his songs into receptacles for their dearest dreams, investing them with generosity and humanity. Romanoff’s first draft of the novelistic “Golden Crown,” about a boxer in Ireland, culminated in a grisly finale. “But I felt like this guy was saying, I don’t want to die in a river with a ring in my pocket. So I wrote what he wanted me to write. A lot of these songs ended up being about things I could identify in my own life, but I had to let these people tell their own stories.”

There’s something radical about the happy endings on The Orphan King, perhaps because there are so few happy endings in the late 2010s. “I almost canceled the rest of the sessions just after the election,” he admits. “I didn’t feel like l could sing. I was too anxious”. As Leonard Cohen had just died, Ed was thinking about Cohen’s song “First We Take Manhattan” and sat down to write “Coronation Blues,” the final song on the record. It was, he admits, a rant written from the perspective of a mad king. It’s a damning bit of political commentary of recent political events as well as a reminder that making music is a radical act.

“For all these songs,  I think if I got anything right, it was allowing each character to have their own voice . I was trying to find out what their truth was.”

Quietly ambitious yet undeniably accomplished, The Orphan King seeks to square up heartbreak with hope, alienation with acceptance, tribulation with an unkillable belief in love. “I wanted to make something beautiful out of something that just felt awful. I want nothing more than to make people smile and feel like they’re not alone. That’s what music has always done for me.,

www.edromanoff.com

 

Tommy Lewis will be the last in line FSR Featured Artist this month for 2017, we always like to feature someone perhaps unfamiliar here in Europe who is tearing it up stateside and who we think needs to be introduced to a wider audience. Maurice Hope (Chief Reviewer on FSR said of Tommy only this wee "He is of a standard that bodes well for both his future, and this kind of music in general" he goes on .........

Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Lewis’ music is of the kind we could do with a whole lot more of filtering through. Warmed in pedal steel, fiddle, lead guitar and more it has a wonderful buoyancy. His blending of country with acoustic blues on the opening track “Salt Water Wine” holds the attention of the listener from first to last! On hearing it I mused to myself, this guy is something rather special. Though I wasn’t wrong, the directional of his music did change, immediately in fact as he dropped the simplicity of the acoustic blues in preference for a form of country music.  Read On

Tommy will be touring herein 2018 and we intend to continue to support that thought and all his endeavors.  

www.tommylewis.net

Merry Christmas and a guid new year everyone 


You could say Brian Langlinais’ new recording, Right Hand Road, was birthed by an ice storm, but that would be getting ahead of the story.

 

Long before that weather event, the album’s roots ran from sea to sea along I-10, home to a slew of bars and nightclubs where bands earn gas money between major cities. For decades, these venues have fostered the uniquely American art form called roadhouse music: a big tent under which blues, country, zydeco, and even jazz come together—often in the same band. Roadhouse legends such as Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball, Omar and the Howlers, Mason Ruffner, and Lee Roy Parnell all came through Langlinais’ hometown of Lafayette, Louisiana, where he cut his teeth in bands playing this crowd-pleasing music.

 

“Back then, the job was—and still is—to make people drink and be happy,” explains Langlinais. “It was about playing songs people know. I covered Wilson Pickett’s catalog, which led me to a lot of lesser-known Stax artists like William Bell. I ended up in blues bands with horns, groups that became more soul than Mississippi Delta blues.”

 

Horns loom large in Langlinais’ history. His father played saxophone with Swamp Pop legends The Shondells, and Brian double-majored in college in trumpet and vocal performance. Ultimately, it was the singer that won out. Langlinais eventually landed in Nashville, where he strayed from his roadhouse roots long enough to record two acclaimed Americana records: Rock & Fire and Tonight I Might. But with Right Hand Road, those roots have called him back.

 

Langlinais had been considering returning to Lafayette to record, when his friend, producer/guitarist D.L. Duncan asked him to go there for a day and cut some tracks with Grammy-winning engineer Tony Daigle (Sonny Landreth, Derek Trucks, James McMurtry, Jon Cleary). They would just lay down a couple of covers, and see if they liked working together. Brought along from Nashville were a bassist, Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Jo-El Sonnier, Levon Helm) and a keyboard player, Patterson Barrett (Gurf Morlix, Buddy Miller), with drummer Brian Brignac (Sonny Landreth) picked up in Lafayette.

 

“We weren’t sure it would turn into a record” Langlinais recalls. “It was just to see how much fun we could have. We were planning on going back to Tennessee the next day, but there was an ice storm in Nashville. None of us could get back, so we ended up tracking for three full days.”

 

In addition to the stellar quality of the playing and singing, what distinguishes the resulting Right Hand Road is its level of songwriting. The tunes tell timeless stories, while adding new twists. William Bell’s classic “Every Day Is a Holiday” has been covered by everyone from Warren Haynes to RZA, but few since Bell himself have brought the well of authentic Southern soul feeling Langlinais and company evidence here.

 

“Wilson Pickett’s ‘Green Grass’ has become a Zydeco standard, but not like we did it,” says Langlinais. “Brian and Tony came up with a groove that went in a different direction, and Ron did a tic-tack thing on bass that made us feel this could be the beginning of a great record.”

 

Though the singer had more covers in his iTunes library, producer D.L. Duncan felt they should write some tunes of their own. “D.L. had some scratch lyrics for a couple of songs,” says Langlinais. “We would come up with a groove, take a little break, D.L. would come back with a lyric that he thought would fit, and I would start singing it. We wrote ‘Louisiana Love,’ ‘My One Desire,’ and the two acoustic songs, ‘Right Hand Road’ and ‘Our Love Is Slippin’ Away,’ in the studio while we were tracking.” Their work sits comfortably next to the covers, displaying the same simplicity mixed with emotional depth that makes this kind of music so enduring.

 

Back in Nashville, Langlinais and Duncan decided they needed two more songs to round out the record, so “Tucumcari Tonight” and “You Can’t Say I Didn’t Love You” were recorded at the Dog House with Lynn Williams (Delbert McClinton, Marcia Ball) on drums, Steve Conn (Sonny Landreth, Keith Urban) on keys, James Pennebaker (Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell) on guitar, and Eoff on bass.

 

 

 

 

“To me, the record symbolizes getting to go back home,” Langlinais says. “If you are from New York and say, ‘I need a sandwich from Katz’s deli,’ people from New York can taste that sandwich. Likewise, if you’re from Lafayette and I say, ‘I’m hungry for a Old Tyme Grocery po’ boy,’ you know the flavor. Going back to Lafayette meant working with people who have the same set of references. I have worked with people who can play a second line groove, but with these musicians it was so much easier to express the minutiae that make a groove specific.”

 

It is this kind of attention to detail that renders Right Hand Road special. You don’t have to be a music scholar or musician to feel in your heart and bones how getting the specifics right adds to the music’s impact. This recording could only have come from someone with Louisiana music in his DNA.

 

“I was born and raised there and my family was one of the first families to get land grants there,” says Langlinais. “My bloodline is only Acadian and French. Going home to Lafayette and doing the music that I’m about was a full circle.”

 

 

  

Russell deCarle (and the boys) are old school, real players and singers. They do things right, true professionals and at the same time great entertainers!

 

Weather it covering songs by the likes of by the likes of the Inkspots, Diana Shore or Hank Snow or self pened classics in the making  crooner deCarle recently took the UK by storm on his first tour in 45 years on the road.

 

"A spot of yodelling when added to his already exemplary vocals exploits placed an icing on the cake, and it wasn’t the only layer such the virtues of the music by them". Mauris Hope on the Newcast gig for FSR - More here

https://russelldecarle.com

Dates April/May Click Here

Our own Rob Ellen catches up with him in a Glen in Scotland.

 

Teresa Storch /  Come Clean

In The Daily Telegraphs Roots Top 20 Albums of 2015  

“She could be the love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews.”

Description

Touring The US and in her native Northeast since 2003, Teresa Storch has been recognized for her writing and performance by Susquehanna Music and Arts Festival 2005, Flat Rock Music Festival 2004, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival 2003 , and Bostons Best Singer/Songwriters Showcase 2003. Her name has spread throughout the country as a voice and presence not to be missed. 

She's called the "love child of Joni Mitchell and Dave Matthews", providing funky guitar rhythms and thought-bending lyrics that move from jazz to blues to folk, keeping your feet and your mind moving. 

Originally from Omaha, Nebraska, she began performing in local dance, drama and vocal productions at a young age. Attending college in Colorado, the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre inspired her to create and perform her own music. Pulled to the singer/songwriter scene of Boston, she traversed the country in 1999. There she found the space to do what she loves, connecting with people in clubs, coffeehouses, on streets and subway platforms. 

You will find Teresa wherever she can do what she loves, connecting with people through music, be it in clubs in or a subway platform. She has shared stages and sidewalks with artists such as Dakota Blonde, Ryan Montbleau, Entrain, Kevin So, Paul and Storm, Jonathan Byrd and Rachel Sage, in venues throughout the country, setting her sights firmly on herfirst European tour (see over leaf) in conjunction with www.houseconcert.eu .

On Tour in the UK with support from FSR The European House Concert Hub and the Medicine Show.

Teresa Storch & Jeff Brown Europe Tour 2016

April 28 Dillon Whiskey Bar augavegur 30,101 Reykjavik, Iceland 8:00pm

April 29 Filey Folk Festival, The Evron Centre  Filey, UK 7:30pm Tickets:   £ 10/20 all 4 days Tel: 07808871118

Tickets: http://www.fileyfolkfestival.bravesites.com/venue-5-evron-centre

April 30* TBC  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm

May 1*    House Concert  Edinburgh, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 10  Contact: symon@visionmechanics.org for info

May 2*    YESBAR  14 Drury St.,Glasgow,Scotland,G2 5AA,UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 5

May 3*    Hotel Argyll  18 Argyll St.,Ullapool, IV26 2UB,UK 8:00pm

May 4*    ‘Beautiful Nairn Nights’ @ WASPs Arts Studio  Nairn, UK 8:00pm Tickets:   £ 8

May 5*    TBC  Inverness, UK 8:00pm

May 7*    The Acoustic Yard Festival, Town Hall Theatre  The Octagon, Westport, Co Mayo, IE 8:00pm Tickets: €22 https://westporttownhall.ticketsolve.com/shows/873548822/events?show_id=873548822

May 9    The Corner Bar  37 Bridge St. Skibbereen, Co Cork, IE 9:30pm

May 12  The Crown Inn  6 Church St., Heanor, Derbyshire, DE75 7AH, UK 8:00pm

May 13   House Concert  Sheffield, UK 8:00pm Tickets: £ 10 Contact: bea@beamarshall.com for info

May 14   TBC Scarborough, UK

May 15   ‘Acoustic Folk Highway’ @The Harrison 28 Harrison St., London,Kings Cross, WC1h 8JF, UK 7:00pm Tickets: £ 5

May 17   The Troubadour  263-267 Old Brompton Rd., London, Earls Court, SW5 9JA, UK 7:45pm Tickets: £ 6https://troubadourlondon.yapsody.com/event/index/25371/teresa-storch

May 20^   ‘Blueprint’ Live Radio Session @Theater vanBeresteyn (foyer) Museumplein 5/a,Veendam, 9641,NL 5:00pm

May 22^   Cafe Peter en Leni  Damsterweg 20, Steendam, 9629 PD, NL 3:00pm 

May 23^   Dwaze Zaken  Prins Hendrikkade 50 Amsterdam, 1012 AC, NL 7:00pm

*With Peter Lacis on guitar!   ^Teresa Solo Show!

QUOTES AND TESTIMONIALS!

“She inhabits her songs so fully you can’t help but be pulled into her world.” – Boston Herald writer Daniel Gewertz

“Mesmerizing vocal riffs…bounding folk-rock sound.” – Northeast Performer

“One of the most inventive writers and solid performers of the current crop of singer/songwriters coming out of Boston. [She] makes me proud to be one.” – veteran singer/songwriter Vance Gilbert

“Infuses contemporary singer/songwriter with traditional folk vibe. It’s no wonder she’s being recognized in her genre.” -Soundcheck Magazine

“The only other time I’ve had this kind of reaction to a performer was when Bonnie Raitt first started doing the rounds of small venues… it was that same thrill of connection.” –Dayle Ann Stratton (fan)

Website:  www.teresastorch.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/teresastorchmusic

Twitter @tstorchmusic 

 
 
 

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The Medicine Show is the home of the House Concert here is our rolling news

 

This site is the sister site to The House Concert Hub community and has been inherited in the main by kind donation of Shaun Belcher and Trailer Star.

It is the sum total of over ten years of tending a tender love of music by Shaun, a life time with Trailer Star and five or so years of an association with Rob Ellen from Medicine Music.

The House Concert Hub community will use it for the purpose of providing a online, all singing all dancing, review and preview area for the music of the community, and the music community at large. Have a look around tell your friends use the share button, tell the world.

We need reviewers, the idea is we have a correspondents in every area of the musical global village, it will be edited and co-ordinated by Rob Ellen of Medicine Music publicist promoter and presenter, if you wish to subscribe as a correspondent, join up here and drop Rob a line, he will send you cd's and send you to shows, display and publicise your content.

Here starts an other adventure.

  Visit The House Concert European Hub (& Acoustic Music Club Network)

 

 

September 2018

1
The Devil Makes Three
70 pts.
Chains Are Broken
New West
FC,JB,RK,TJ,LK
2
Jimmy LaFave
65 pts.
Peace Town
Music Road Records
PKO
3
Malcolm Holcombe
48 pts.
Come Hell Or High Water
Gypsy Eyes Music
FB,JBO
4
Cody Canada & the Departed
47 pts.
3
Blue Rose Records
CVL,DHO
5
Jeffrey Foucault
43 pts.
Blood Brothers
Blueblade Records
MB,SZ
6
The War And Treaty
42 pts.
Healing Tide
Thirty Tigers
FCE,AL,MG
7
Martha Fields
40 pts.
Dancing Shadows
Independent
SP,DH,RST,RW
8
The Weight Band
35 pts.
World Gone Mad
Must Have Music
DD,CRS,BM
9
David Olney
32 pts.
This Side Or The Other
Black Hen Music
LM
 
The Black Sorrows
32 pts.
Citizen John
Blue Rose Records
 
11
Robbie Fulks and Linda Gail Lewis
31 pts.
Wild Wild Wild
Bloodshot Records
GS
12
Hadley McCall Thackston
28 pts.
Hadley McCall Thackston
Wolfe Island Records
 
 
Nathan Bell
28 pts.
Er Gwaetha Pawb a Phopeth
Angry Stick
PK
14
Curse Of Lono
26 pts.
As I Fell
Submarine Cat Records
MM,JF
15
Ryan Martin
25 pts.
Gimme Some Light
High Moon
 
 
Stephen Simmons
25 pts.
Gall
Locke Creek Records
TK,HDB
17
Jason McNiff
23 pts.
Joy And Independence
At The Helm Records
 
 
Jim Lauderdale
23 pts.
Time Flies
Yep Roc
 
 
Kevin Gordon
23 pts.
Tilt and Shine
Crowville Media
MP
20
Eliza Gilkyson
21 pts.
Secularia
Red House Records
KG,JJC
21
Boz Scaggs
20 pts.
Out Of the Blues
Concord Records
BH,JSM
 
Lucero
20 pts.
Among The Ghosts
Thirty Tigers
JJ
 
Melissa Carper & Rebecca Patek
20 pts.
Brand New Old-Time Songs
Independent
MW
24
The Jayhawks
17 pts.
Back Roads and Abandoned Motels
Legacy
 
25
Lori McKenna
16 pts.
Tree
Cn Records

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